Hatless Jack

Hatless Jack

The President, the Fedora, and the History of An American Style

Book - 2004
Rate this:
Boaters, derbies, fedoras—until just a generation or two ago, a man’s social status, if not his very masculinity, was defined by his hat. For centuries, men owned hats for all seasons and occasions. But in the 1960s, the male hat became obsolete. Just as women shed their white gloves for the sexual revolution, men cast aside centuries of tradition and stopped wearing hats.The hat’s demise has over time been credited to President Kennedy, or “Hatless Jack,” due to his reluctance to be photographed wearing a hat for fear it made him look old. But one president alone did not make or break a trend. In this quirky social history, Neil Steinberg traces the evolution of the hat over centuries, as a costly but necessary investment, as a symbol of social status, and masculinity, and as a global industry.
Publisher: New York : Plume, [2004]
Copyright Date: ♭2004
ISBN: 9780452285231
Branch Call Number: 391.43 St348H 2004
Characteristics: xxvi, 342 pages ; 18 cm

Related Resources


From the critics

Community Activity


Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.


Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.


Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.


Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.


Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number


Subject Headings


Find it at SPL

To Top