The Sorcerer of Bayreuth

The Sorcerer of Bayreuth

Richard Wagner, His Work, and His World

Book - 2013
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"Richard Wagner (1813-1883) is one of the most influential--and also one of the most controversial--composers in the history of music. Over the course of his long career, he produced a stream of spellbinding works that challenged musical convention through their richness and tonal experimentation, ultimately paving the way for modernism. This book presents an in-depth but easy-to-read overview of Wagner's life, work and times. It considers a wide range of themes, including the composer's original sources of inspiration; his fetish for exotic silks; his relationship with his wife, Cosima, and with his mistress, Mathilde Wesendonck; the anti-semitism that is undeniably present in the operas; their proto-cinematic nature; and the turbulent legacy both of the Bayreuth Festival and of Wagnerism itself. Making use of the very latest scholarship--much of it undertaken by the author himself in connection with his editorship of The Wagner Journal--Millington reassesses received notions about Wagner and his work, demolishing ill-informed opinion in favour of proper critical understanding. It is a radical--and occasionally controversial--reappraisal of this most perplexing of composers."--book jacket.
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, [2013]
ISBN: 9780199933761
0199933766
Branch Call Number: 782.1092 W1256M 2013
Characteristics: 320 pages : illustrations (some color), genealogical table ; 25 cm

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