Ci ke Nie Yinniang

Ci ke Nie Yinniang

The assassin

DVD - 2016 | Chinese
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Nie Yinniang returns after several years in exile. The mission of her order is to eliminate the tyranny of the Governors who avoid the authority of the Emperor. Now she will have to choose between sacrificing the man she loves, or break definitively with the 'Order of the Assassins.'
Publisher: Plano, TX : Well Go USA Entertainment, [2016]
Branch Call Number: CHINESE DVD CI KE N
Characteristics: 1 videodisc (106 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in
digital,optical,rda
video file,DVD video,rda
Language Note: In Mandarin with optional subtitles in English, French, or simplified or traditional Chinese
Alternative Title: Assassin
Nie Yinniang

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Most Egregious Oscar Snubs, 2016 edition

Cinematography – The Assassin: Every image is a painting in Hou Hsiao-Hsien’s long-awaited return to cinema screens (in classic Academy ratio!) with the meditative 8th century world of The Assassin. (more)


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j
jimg2000
Feb 23, 2018

Many comments and quotes disappeared on this item. Here is mine. Read those from other library patrons in "Summary.":

Aug 16, 2016

Film critics apparently loved the cinematography of this martial art film with artful production sets and the mystic Wudang mountain 武当山 as backdrop. The story itself was very cryptic, with little dialogue as if Cliff Notes from the novel Nie Yinniang (聶隱娘, Niè Yǐnniáng) by Pei Xing (裴铏) who wrote the short novella during the Tang Dynasty. The long takes within fixed frames could be excessive to some but a feast for the eye. (More on the story in "Summary.".) Look at these approval ratings:
6.4/10 IMDb, 79% Rotten Tomatoes and 80% Metacritic.

t
tj_is_cool
Feb 23, 2018

Super bad. Slow, boring, tedious ...

d
dwightmoody
Oct 23, 2016

If you want a beautiful movie you've come to the right place. This is film for Jim Jarmusch fans. The camera is making paintings. The actors aren't afraid to be quiet and still. The fights are few and shortly over. The plot is, honestly, a little hard to follow but it is also somewhat beside the point.

n
Nursebob
Oct 11, 2016

Curiously filmed in a 4:3 ratio, director Hou Hsiao-Hsien nevertheless manages to fill his small screen with ravishing asymmetrical mise-en-scènes delineated by rich silks and guttering candles, mountain peaks and forest roads, sylvan waterfalls and moss-covered boulders. Those expecting a martial arts actioner will walk away disappointed for this is a slow, languorous piece of art whose frustratingly opaque storyline takes a backseat to its visual pageantry.

j
jimg2000
Aug 16, 2016

Film critics apparently loved the cinematography of this martial art film with artful production sets and the mystic Wudang mountain 武当山 as backdrop. The story itself was very cryptic, with little dialogue as if Cliff Notes from the novel Nie Yinniang (聶隱娘, Niè Yǐnniáng) by Pei Xing (裴铏) who wrote the short novella during the Tang Dynasty. The long takes within fixed frames could be excessive to some but a feast for the eye. (More on the story in "Summary.".) Look at these approval ratings:
6.4/10 IMDb, 79% Rotten Tomatoes and 80% Metacritic.

j
jing88wei
Aug 08, 2016

Slow going, artsy pictures, not much action

r
RoyalJellyIII
Jun 03, 2016

Pretentious twaddle.

d
davidchang
May 23, 2016

Pro: good scenery
Con: slooooow movie, very hard to follow. do not understand the movie plot.(I am a native mandarin speaker)

Do not know how it get so many awards????? you need high intelligent in art and imagination to appreciate the movie which I am not.

m
mlee657
May 21, 2016

The photography is simply brilliant! I'm amazed they could locate such distinct scenery to take the shots. They are places not on the tourists attraction list.

m
michaeljprince
Apr 13, 2016

Very slow moving movie, I had a hard time following it without falling asleep. I fast forward it a few times, but it didn't improve.

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j
jimg2000
Feb 23, 2018

jimg2000 Aug 16, 2016

Intro:
In 7th century China, the Tang Dynasty is in decline. The Imperial Court seeks to protect itself by establishing garrisons at the frontiers of its empire. Two centuries later, the militarized provinces waver
in their loyalty to the Court. Some move to distance themselves from the Emperor's control. At that time, Weibo asserts itself as the strongest of those provinces.
===
... Since then, the Court is the Court and Weibo is Weibo. The Princess implemented that decisive break. When her son Tian Ji'an came of age, she divided two matching jades: One to her son, one to you. She wished the two of you to maintain the imperial edict. To be resolute in preserving the peace between the Imperial Court and Weibo.

j
jimg2000
Feb 23, 2018

jimg2000 Aug 16, 2016

The Bluebird:
The King of Kophen's bluebird failed to sing for three years. One day the Queen remarked: Birds sing only to their own kind, set the bird before a mirror! The King heeded her advice. The bluebird saw its own image, it sang of its sadness, it danced, until it expired.
...
Princess Jiacheng taught me the zither. She told me a story about a bluebird's dance. She herself was the bluebird. She left the Court for Weibo all by herself. There was no one like her in Weibo.

The job:
You have mastered the sword but your heart lacks resolve. I shall return you to Weibo to kill your cousin. Tian Ji'an.

The Assassin's mind:
The way of the sword is pitiless. Saintly virtues play no part in it. Your skills are matchless, but your mind is hostage to human sentiments.

j
jimg2000
Feb 23, 2018

biny May 29, 2016 ★★★★½

Filming Locations:
- Kyoto, Japan(castle park and garden)
- Wudang, Hubei Province, China(Wudang Mountains)(Nun's temple in prologue:Nanyan Temple)
- Jia Jiu Liao, Wulai District, New Taipei City, Taiwan(forest canopy)
- Dajiu Lake, Shennongjia Forestry District, Hubei Province, China(closing scenes,Yinniang attended to by mirror polisher)
- Cilan Forest Recreation Area, Datong Township, Yilan, Taiwan
- Central Motion Picture Corporation Studios, Taipei, Taiwan
- Nara, Japan
- Shoshazan Engyo-ji Temple, Himeji, Japan(magician's house)
- Inner Mongolia, China(pursuit scenes)

湖北: 武当山南岩、神农架大九湖湿地、利川腾龙洞、随州银杏谷
内蒙古赤峰 红山军马场(序场刺杀大僚 饯别田兴 白桦林对战精精儿)
山西平遥 平遥古城瓮城(元家杀手出城)
河北涿州 涿州影视城(隐娘田季安屋顶交手)

日本奈良 地狱谷新池、若草山、海龙王寺、等弥神社 (忽那汐里舞别妻夫木聪)
日本京都 东映太秦映画村 (妻夫木聪 忽那汐里)
日本京都 大觉寺、高台寺、东福寺、清凉寺、平安神宫 (片头出片名 寺庙空景 庭园 瑚姬遇袭阁道)
日本姬路 书写山圆教寺(序场道姑训示隐娘 阮经天带领中军围击空空儿)

台湾台北 中影文化城 原木搭景(聂府 田府 瑚姬寓所)
台湾宜兰 九寮溪(妻夫木聪溪边救人)
台湾宜兰 栖兰山神木群 (师徒对决)

j
jimg2000
Aug 16, 2016

Intro:
In 7th century China, the Tang Dynasty is in decline. The Imperial Court seeks to protect itself by establishing garrisons at the frontiers of its empire. Two centuries later, the militarized provinces waver
in their loyalty to the Court. Some move to distance themselves from the Emperor's control. At that time, Weibo asserts itself as the strongest of those provinces.
===
... Since then, the Court is the Court and Weibo is Weibo. The Princess implemented that decisive break. When her son Tian Ji'an came of age, she divided two matching jades: One to her son, one to you. She wished the two of you to maintain the imperial edict. To be resolute in preserving the peace between the Imperial Court and Weibo.

j
jimg2000
Aug 16, 2016

The Bluebird:
The King of Kophen's bluebird failed to sing for three years. One day the Queen remarked: Birds sing only to their own kind, set the bird before a mirror! The King heeded her advice. The bluebird saw its own image, it sang of its sadness, it danced, until it expired.
...
Princess Jiacheng taught me the zither. She told me a story about a bluebird's dance. She herself was the bluebird. She left the Court for Weibo all by herself. There was no one like her in Weibo.

The job:
You have mastered the sword but your heart lacks resolve. I shall return you to Weibo to kill your cousin. Tian Ji'an.

The Assassin's mind:
The way of the sword is pitiless. Saintly virtues play no part in it. Your skills are matchless, but your mind is hostage to human sentiments.

Summary

Add a Summary
j
jimg2000
Feb 23, 2018

ONLY ALLOW 4000 CHARACTERS

waldewart Jan 28, 2016 ★★★★★

If one is expecting a typical wuxia pian--endless, non-stop action, flying swordsmen, whooshing blades--one might find oneself disappointed by director Hou Hsiao Hsiean’s latest film, The Assassin. Based partly on a fantastic Ninth Century tale, ‘Nie Yinniang’ by Pei Xing and grounded in reality by the use of historical Tang Dynasty characters and events, the film moves at a pace some viewers might be tempted to describe as ‘glacial’. Yes there is swordplay and at least one hint of the supernatural at work for nefarious purposes but the film focusses more on the heroic or chivalrous aspects of the wuxia genre, examining the motivations and conscience of a nigh-invincible assassin sent to kill an allegedly corrupt local official.
The Assassin lingers on set and setting, Hou’s predilection for long takes confined to interiors and landscape rather than lingering on prolonged battle scenes, courtesy of Master Cinematographer Mark Lee Ping-Bing. If one is familiar with Wong Kar Wai’s In the Mood for Love and 2046 or Springtime in a Small Town, the 2002 film by Tian Zhuangzhuang, one knows what to expect from the camerawork of Mr. Lee-- Deeply saturated color (where the film is in color), roving tracking shots, scenes of an almost pristine beauty. The film is shot in a 1.44:1 ratio rather than a Cinemascopic wide-screen aspect, lending more credence to the suggestion that the director is more concerned with framing interiors--psychological as well as architectural--rather than delivering martial arts mayhem on a grand scale.
Assassin is a satisfying, if difficult, film, well-deserving of the accolades with which it has been bestowed. It may not be everybody’s cup of tea but will reward the viewer with an open eye and mind.

===

d2013 Jun 10, 2016 ★★★

Done in a contained manner but still a beautiful film, you just have to bring a dose of patience for this one.
===
jing88wei Aug 08, 2016 (Not rated)

Slow going, artsy pictures, not much action
===
twzrhd Aug 26, 2016 ½★

If you enjoy long pauses, looking at distant mountains, and no plot, video stuck on a scene, than this is for you. Any DVD at redbox will be a better movie! This is lots of video of the movie that never was.
===

Nursebob Oct 11, 2016 ★★★

Curiously filmed in a 4:3 ratio, director Hou Hsiao-Hsien nevertheless manages to fill his small screen with ravishing asymmetrical mise-en-scènes delineated by rich silks and guttering candles, mountain peaks and forest roads, sylvan waterfalls and moss-covered boulders. Those expecting a martial arts actioner will walk away disappointed for this is a slow, languorous piece of art whose frustratingly opaque storyline takes a backseat to its visual pageantry.
===
dwightmoody Oct 23, 2016 ★★★★½

If you want a beautiful movie you've come to the right place. This is film for Jim Jarmusch fans. The camera is making paintings. The actors aren't afraid to be quiet and still. The fights are few and shortly over. The plot is, honestly, a little hard to follow but it is also somewhat beside the point.
===
JLIOlib Mar 07, 2017 ★★

unnecessary slow motions... and a lot of them!
===
tuan_canada Mar 10, 2017 (Not rated)

I am an Asian man, and I have watched countless bad movies in my life, but this one, oh!!! it tops them all. I am so sorry, I could not finish the movie.
===
PeterRLD Nov 19, 2017 ★★★½

My first reaction was confusion over who was who - the film was full of guys with identical beards and fine robes, beautifully photographed. I also had little grasp on the politics of the story. And the action was slowwwwwww! (And was she really abducted by a nun as a child to be raised as an assassin? What else did those Catholics get up to?!!) But as the film progressed, I found myself more immersed in it. The cinematography was wonderful, so I was willing to accept a little confusion in exchange for such beauty.

j
jimg2000
Aug 16, 2016

A. From Wikipedia, Excerpt: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nie_Yinniang#cite_note-A-1

Nie Yinniang (Chinese: 聶隱娘, Niè Yǐnniáng) is a short story written in Classical Chinese by Pei Xing, a Chinese writer lived during the Tang Dynasty.[1] The story is set in 9th century China and tells the story of Nie Yinniang who was trained in martial art from a young age. She is the daughter of Nie Feng, a general under the command of the Tang Dynasty's famous Tian Ji'an. The story was published in the collection Feixingchuanqi (Chinese: 裴鉶传奇).

B. Short story 唐传奇·聂隐娘 from the Tang Dynasty web link:
https://www.douban.com/note/199154545/

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