Hidden Figures

Hidden Figures

The Untold True Story of Four African-American Women Who Helped Launch Our Nation Into Space

Book - 2016
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Explores the previously uncelebrated but pivotal contributions of NASA's African-American women mathematicians to America's space program, describing how Jim Crow laws segregated them from their white counterparts despite their groundbreaking successes.
Publisher: New York, NY : Harper, An Imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, [2016]
Edition: Young readers' edition, First edition
ISBN: 9780062662385
0062662384
9780062662378
0062662376
Branch Call Number: J510.9252 L5156H 2016
Characteristics: 231 pages : illustrations, portraits ; 22 cm
Additional Contributors: Shetterly, Margot Lee Hidden figures

Opinion

From Library Staff

Shetterly relates the untold story of World War II-era African American female mathematicians hired as “human computers,” running calculations and testing theories that helped advance the American aviation industry.


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rogeraeschliman
Feb 24, 2019

Shetterly tells a very complicated story spanning many decades very nicely. The book is chock full of history and science, woven into the lives of the incredible black women computers who did great work to make great things happen in very difficult circumstances. Easy and quick to read. The movie is better in many ways, more powerful in the telling of the racism facts, but necessarily dropping a lot of the science and earlier history of the computers' work on aviation in WWII. Read the book and enjoy the movie but don't expect them to the the same.

a
auri_12
Feb 21, 2019

Katherine Johnson,Dorothy Vaughan,and Mary Jackson. Three of the smartest African- American women that worked at NASA and broke barriers of that time, when racism was really bad. The African-Americans had it bad compared to everyone else. These women were making a difference though. They were mathemagician and really helped the NASA program get man to the moon. There was also more problems but they overcame it and were really successful.

b
blawrence3
Jun 20, 2017

Really wanted to enjoy this book. Subject was very important and should still be read by young readers, especially girls. However, content seem to be lacking emotional depth for this subject matter. I would still recommend it.

s
superreader64
Jun 19, 2017

Interesting and inspiring book for young readers. I highly recommend it for ages 9-14.

p
pktab
Apr 15, 2017

What an interesting and incredible story! I can't wait to see the movie now.

j
josiehann
Apr 12, 2017

What an amazing story!

ArapahoeMaryA Feb 08, 2017

An important and inspiring story told, unfortunately, in a relatively uninspired manner.

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tml387
Mar 07, 2017

tml387 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 8 and 12

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ArapahoeMaryA Feb 08, 2017

The cruelty of racial prejudice was so often accompanied by absurdity, a tangle of arbitrary rules and distinctions that subverted the shared interests of people who had been taught to see themselves as irreconcilably different.

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