Select language, opens an overlay
Paperbacks From Hell

Paperbacks From Hell

The Twisted History of '70s and '80s Horror Fiction

eBook - 2017
Average Rating:
Rate this:
14
1
1
Take a tour through the horror paperback novels of two iconic decades . . . if you dare. Page through dozens and dozens of amazing book covers featuring well-dressed skeletons, evil dolls, and knife-wielding killer crabs! Read shocking plot summaries that invoke devil worship, satanic children, and haunted real estate! Horror author and vintage paperback book collector Grady Hendrix offers killer commentary and witty insight on these trashy thrillers that tried so hard to be the next Exorcist or Rosemary's Baby. Complete with story summaries and artist and author profiles, this unforgettable volume dishes on familiar authors like V. C. Andrews and R. L. Stine, plus many more who've faded into obscurity. Also included are recommendations for which of these forgotten treasures are well worth your reading time and which should stay buried.
Publisher: Philadelphia : Quirk Books, [2017]
Copyright Date: ©2017
ISBN: 9781594749827
1594749825
Branch Call Number: EBOOK OVERDRIVE
Characteristics: 1 online resource (254 pages) : illustrations (chiefly color)
Additional Contributors: Errickson, Will 1970-

Related Resources


Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment
f
Frenzii
May 11, 2021

A very informative and very fun look at horror novels of decades past. I highly recommend this book to fans of horror and fans of pop culture history.

DBRL_AdamR Apr 14, 2021

A breezy, fun, and very funny retrospective of the crazy world of '70s and '80s paperback horror fiction that brought back fond memories of exploring my mother's bookshelf as a child in the late '80s. Each chapter covers one of the many trends in horror of that time - gothic horror, satanic possession, haunted real estate, creepy kids, killer pets, Native American horror, weird science. Lots of wild, tacky and beautiful book covers on display, and completely off-the-wall plot descriptions that must be seen to be believed.

loganlib_Ashley Jan 08, 2021

Fantastic history of horror fiction through the context of the art that emblazoned it's covers.

👿 Fascinating! You can see where many tropes of goofy conspiracy theories of today have their origins in horror stories from the 70s. In particular, the Qanon nonsense tracks back to a series of books by one Russ Martin, on Playboy Press, who envisioned a Satanic Organization, run by the elite 0.01% who really rule the world, blah, blah, blah. The author doesn't call this to your attention, but you can figure it out fast enough. Bigfoot, UFOs, ESP, rogue computers, Satan worship, weird medical experiments, killer mutant animals, and more, it all started here! Recommended by the American Mothers' Horror Appreciation Society.

l
lukasevansherman
Dec 20, 2018

I think the phrase "Don't judge a book by its cover" is more often wrong than not. Grady Hendrix clearly is of the same mind and his "Paperbacks from Hell" has some truly mind-warping covers. Have you ever wanted to see Nazi Leprechauns? Yeah, me neither, but now I can't believe I've lived without "The Little People." The book is both a history of an often neglected and reviled genre (horror) and a showcase for lurid covers. Hendrix writes as a fan but is also upfront about the sheer badness of many of the books. Move over classy photography book, this will look great on your coffee table.

SkokieStaff_Steven Aug 21, 2018

It’s surprising what comes out on audio these days. Case in point: Grady Hendrix’s “Paperbacks from Hell: The Twisted History of '70s and '80s Horror Fiction.” While Hendrix writes some entertaining prose, a great part of the appeal of his book comes from its illustrations, hundreds of garish and often absurd cover images, many of which feature children, clowns, or skeletons. I recommend listening to the book while peering at the print version from time to time although the audio alone suffices. For a librarian of a certain age, reading this book is like opening an entire box of Proustian madeleines. “The Exorcist”! “The Omen”! “The Amityville Horror”! “Interview with the Vampire”! “Flowers in the Attic”! While these titles bring back memories, I especially enjoyed Hendrix’s take on the now deservedly forgotten titles of the period. If you don’t get excited about Nazi leprechauns (“Gestapochauns”) or rampaging armies of pincer-waving crabs, you shouldn’t be reading this book.

z
zvanstanley
May 11, 2018

This was a fun tour through the horror books of the 70s and 80s. By no means meant to be a complete history, it still does a great job of treating major themes. A book that never takes itself too seriously, this is a fun read for horror fans.

a
abcDena
Apr 27, 2018

I really like this book, but it didn't provide the deep dive into horror fiction history like I was hoping and expecting. The glut of vintage paperback covers is incredible though and has given me a list of throwbacks to hunt down and read. The print quality, paper stock and full color images make this book worth a flip, but if you're looking for true history of the horror genre, Grady Hendrix disappoints.

JCLGreggW Mar 03, 2018

A smart, funny, and nostalgic look at the 70s/80s horror genre - perfect for those with fond memories of rummaging through boxes of paperbacks at swap meets, dusty bookstores, and garage sales.

j
JEM_LPL
Feb 26, 2018

Author Grady Hendrix has written one of the most important and most enjoyable books on Horror since Stephen King's "Danse Macabre". He focuses on the "Satanic Panic" of the 1970s and 1980s, when paperback horror novels had their biggest hay day in the recent century. He twits the worst of the worst (Does even Michelle remember "Michelle Remembers"?) but he interviews important horror artists and authors with genuine affection and respect. Even readers who aren't horror fans will enjoy his hilarious notes on "How To Avoid Sex With Satan", "The Hardest Working Skeletons In The Business" and "How To Tell If Your OB/GYN Is A Devil Worshipper".

View All Comments

Age

Add Age Suitability
OatmealThunder Nov 15, 2017

OatmealThunder thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at SPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top