These Truths

These Truths

A History of the United States

Book - 2018
Average Rating:
Rate this:
5
"The American experiment rests on three ideas--"these truths," Jefferson called them--political equality, natural rights, and the sovereignty of the people. And it rests, too, "on a dedication to inquiry, fearless and unflinching," writes Jill Lepore in a groundbreaking investigation into the American past that places truth itself at the center of the nation's history. In riveting prose, These truths tells the story of America, beginning in 1492, to ask whether the course of events has proven the nation's founding truths, or belied them. "A nation born in contradiction, liberty in a land of slavery, sovereignty in a land of conquest, will fight, forever, over the meaning of its history," Lepore writes, finding meaning in those very contradictions as she weaves American history into a majestic tapestry of faith and hope, of peril and prosperity, of technological progress and moral anguish. A spellbinding chronicle filled with arresting sketches of Americans from John Winthrop and Frederick Douglass to Pauli Murray and Phyllis Schlafly, These truths offers an authoritative new history of a great, and greatly troubled, nation"--
Publisher: New York : W.W. Norton & Company, [2018]
Edition: First edition
Copyright Date: ©2018
ISBN: 9780393635249
0393635244
Branch Call Number: 973 L558T 2018
Characteristics: xx, 932 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm

Opinion

From Library Staff

A sweeping, elegant examination of whether the U.S. has stayed true to the principles of the Declaration of Independence, revealing our nation’s numerous contradictions. Includes portraits of lesser-known figures, including women and people of color.

While you wait, try "The Secret History of Wonder Woman."


From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment
e
EmilyEm
Jul 21, 2020

Historian Lepore tells America’s political history from its ‘discovery’ through current times, weaving themes of ‘equality, popular sovereignty, and consent of the governed’ along with profiles of people who were sometimes little known, but turned our country in new directions.

At 788 pages in paperback edition, reading this book is a commitment. I found it all interesting, but was drawn to the chapters on the Progressive era at the turn of the 20th century in which my grandfather was active and, of course, those in my own lifespan post- WWII. I agree with the Booklist reviewer who said: ‘These truths, as enunciated by Thomas Jefferson in the Declaration of Independence, include political equality, natural (or creator-given) rights, and the ultimate sovereignty of the people. Though chronologically structured, this is more of a civics lesson than a narrative history. Throughout this journey from Columbus to the present, Lepore consistently stresses the often-anguishing contradictions between the ideals and realities of American life.’

m
machatka
May 19, 2020

a Bill Gates recommendation

c
candlesticktroughs
Nov 17, 2019

"Disgusted and discouraged, Johnson announced on March 31 that he would not run for reelection. He had decided to dedicate himself to ending the war. 'With our hopes and the world's hope for peace in the balance every day,' he said in a televised address, ' I do not believe that i should devote an hour or a day of my time to any personal partisan causes.' The stunned NEW YORK TIMES ran a can-you-believe-it, three-tier headline: JOHNSON SAYS HE WON'T RUN; HALTS NORTH VIETNAM RAIDS; BIDS HANOI JOIN PEACE MOVES. " " ' Young men in Central Park, New York, mourned Martin Luther King Jr. following his assassination in Memphis on April 4, 1968.' " "In 1992, when Ailes and Limbaugh together visited the White House, President Bush saw fit to carry Limbaugh's bag." "The Ohio-born Ailes had been working in television when he became an adviser to Richard Nixon in 1968."

f
farbrite
Jan 13, 2019

This is more of a political history than a traditional history, while also evaluating the trends that shaped American politics and government. It's actually fairly easy to read, although it might take a couple of checkouts to finish it! It certainly illuminated the past in ways that my formal education didn't. I found myself particularly interested in her view of more recent events that I experienced myself. I don't generally read nonfiction, but this was definitely worth my time.

b
bwinlr
Nov 15, 2018

Just began reading this book, after seeing it in The New York Times Book Review. It's fascinating. What Ms. Lepore has set out to do is write an honest, objective history of the United States, i.e., neither overly positive nor negative; just factual. Simply stated: it's not the type of history book we would have read in high school.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at SPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top